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Theodore Fried: Beyond the Still Life

Theodore Fried: Beyond the Still Life

Fried was born just after the turn of the 20th century, to an upper-class Hungarian family. Along with the Victorian social conventions he would have learned in childhood was a custom that has fallen out of practice today: the practice of sending specific messages with flowers.

Currently making a comeback in the 21st century, the language of flowers was a Victorian custom by which, in a society that refrained from direct speech and obsessed with detail and subtlety, a message or sentiment that was not so easily expressed in words could be conveyed in a floral arrangement. In other words, sending a flower arrangement was the same as sending a text message to someone today.

What messages could Fried’s still life paintings convey?

Visit the exhibition, on view May-September, 2015, at the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art.

April 26, 2015 – August 2015

Louis Davidson: Synagogues 360

Louis Davidson: Synagogues 360

Gallery: Brodsky Fine Arts Gallery and Second Floor Special Exhibition Gallery

April 26, 2015 – August 31, 2015

SYNAGOGUES360 provides a visual record of Jewish culture, showing and preserving synagogues by means of interactive 360 degree panoramic photos. It invites you and future generations to view the interiors of Jewish places of worship, which are clear and irrefutable indicators of the state of Jewish culture, architecture, art and stature in their communities throughout the Diaspora. Each synagogue is literally a “sign of the times” and window into the Jewish past and present.

Time, weather, political and demographic shift inevitably erode cities and buildings. These along with occasional upsurges of violent anti-Semitism, have been particularly thorough erasers of the physical evidence of Jewish history. SYNAGOGUES360 visually and digitally saves Jewish synagogues, an impressive physical expression of Jewish culture, for this and future generations to see and experience. (www.synagogues360.org)

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Ancient Ways: Modern Forms

February 5-April 2, 2015

Opening Reception: February 12

The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art is pleased to present the new exhibition Ancient Ways: Modern Forms, An Exploration of Related Experience in Native American and Jewish Cultures by Oklahoma Native Artists. This exhibit features the works of Cherokee treasures Jane Osti and Martha Berry, as well as works from the members of the Southeast Indian Artists Association, who created works that touch on traditions and related experiences in the cultures of two ancient tribal peoples: the Jewish people, and the Native American people.

Ancient Ways: Modern Forms was conceived as a means to find and celebrate the common ground shared by two cultures living here in Oklahoma: Jewish and Native American. The Sherwin Miller Museum asked the artists of the Southeastern Indian Artists Association to create a new work or find, in their existing work, a connection between the traditions and experiences of the two peoples; the tribes of Oklahoma and the tribes of Israel.

Most connections fell into two types; the importance of passing on traditions and keeping them alive, and the shared experiences of Diaspora and persecution.

One work is Troy Jackson’s remarkable sculpture Carrying Tradition, which is the embodiment of the cultural imperative of both peoples; to keep tradition alive and modernize it for use in our contemporary age. Artists Jane Osti, Chase Kahwinhut Earles, David Pruitt, Karin Walkingstick, and Scott Roberts created pottery based on ancient tribal forms; forms used by early potters in the ancient nations of Israel and Judah.

The second part of the exhibit is Eradicating the Other: Forced Removal, Diaspora, and Assimilation as Experienced by Native American and Jewish Peoples. Both cultures have suffered negative consequences for their beliefs and traditions. Artist Shan Goshorn created a woven basket, Pain. Parallel. Prayer, a Cherokee style singe-weave basket woven from paper splints printed with the definition of genocide and images of the Holocaust.

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Building Bash

Please join us on Sunday evening, October 26, 2014 at The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art for an evening of honoring the past and building a future at this year’s premier fundraising event the Building Bash. The festivities this year will honor Lori and Michael A. Cohen and Deana and Michael G. Maloney for their leadership and dedication to the Museum. Thanks to their generosity, the new entrance and gallery dedication in memory of Mildred and Julius Sanditen will be the first expansion to the building since the grand opening on Zarrow Campus. The grand opening of the new Sanditen Gallery will feature the exhibit Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves.

Fans of both Fine Art Photography and Star Trek legend will be thrilled with this acclaimed photographic exhibition of Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves. Nurturing his artistic interest in hidden identities, volunteer subjects were invited in photography sessions to reveal their secret selves, whether by costume, pose, or attitude. The resulting portraits are the Secret Selves exhibit.

Mr. Nimoy will make a rare appearance as the keynote speaker for the evening via Skype. The Building Bash is being headed up this year by Chair Sallye Mann and Patron Chair Susan Fenster. Your patronage and participation is critical to the success of this event, supporting one-third of our operating budget and making ambitious educational and programming goals possible. Each year, the number of visitors touring The Miller increases. Museum attendance will exceed 12,000 in 2014, three times the number of visitors just 10 years ago. The Museum looks forward to greeting you and your guests at our Building Bash.

If you would like patron information or have any questions, please contact Melissa Schnur, Museum Development Director at 918.492.1818.

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OJFF

The first ever Oklahoma Jewish Film Festival (OJFF) makes its debut Sunday, October 19-Thursday, October 23. Conceived as a partnership between Circle Cinema, the Jewish Federation of Tulsa, and The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art, the OJFF is a five-day celebration of Jewish Film.

“Our goal for the first ever Oklahoma Jewish Film Festival was to select quality films ranging from comedies to dramas to documentaries that would entertain and engage a broad audience,” said Drew Diamond, Executive Director.

Tickets are $10 per film, with the exception of Return of the Violin which are $15 and include the reception immediately before the showing. Tickets are available at Circle Cinema or online at www.circlecinema.com; tickets will also be on sale at the door prior to each screening.

Click here to download a film festival brochure.


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The Many Faces of Jerusalem

In 2012 to celebrate its 20th anniversary, the Israel Quilters Association put out a call to artists world-wide to attend the conference and to enter a quilt to be shown in an exhibit to be held during the conference.  The exhibit, titled The Many Faces of Jerusalem, was exhibited on the BYU campus on the Mount of Olives, and is coming to the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art in October 2014.

The Quilts chose Jerusalem for its international, multicultural character. The Capital of Israel, Jerusalem is holy to Jews, Christians and Muslims. People of many ethnic groups, nationalities and religions live together nestled among the history, architecture, and legends that span thousands of years.  The Israel Quilts Association invited artists to enter quilts in this exhibit; quilts that expressed their ideas, hopes, memories, and dreams of Jerusalem. The result is a multicolored and multicultural feast for the eyes; the textiles of dream.

 

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Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves

Both fans of Fine Art Photography and fans of Star Trek will be thrilled to see this acclaimed exhibit of Leonard Nimoy’s photography, Secret Selves. Due to his fame as Spock on Star Trek, Nimoy, an accomplished photographer who became an expert in dealing with another identity in his life, decided to investigate hidden identities—secret selves. He called for volunteers to participate in a session in which they revealed their secret selves, whether by costume, pose, or attitude. The resulting portraits are the Secret Selves exhibit.

 

 

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Tulsa Jewish Film Series: The Sturgeon Queens

Tulsa Jewish Film Series —Our Films Aren’t Selected …They’re Chosen!
Film: The Sturgeon Queens: • Sun., June 29 • 1pm• Circle Cinema (12 South Lewis Ave)

For nearly 100 years, people have made the trek to New York City’s Lower East Side to buy smoked herring and lox at the famed Russ and Daughters emporium. Four generations of the Russ family have kept the iconic store afloat – from patriarch and founder Joel Russ, who left the store in his daughters’ hands, to the present owners, his great-grandchildren, who struggle to bring the little store into the 21st Century. THE STURGEON QUEENS is the deliciously charming true story of one immigrant family’s experience in America. Tickets can be purchased at the door or on Circle Cinema’s website. However, please RSVP to Mindy at 918.495.1100 or mprescott@jewishtulsa.org to let us know you will be attending the movie, as THERE WILL BE A SPECIAL TREAT FROM RUSS AND DAUGHTERS FOLLOWING THE FILM!

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Tulsa Jewish Film Series: The German Doctor

Tulsa Jewish Film Series —Our Films Aren’t Selected …They’re Chosen! Film: The German DoctorThurs., May 157 p.m.Circle Cinema (12 South Lewis Ave) • Patagonia, 1960. A German doctor meets an Argentinean family and follows them on a long desert road to a small town where the family will be starting a new life. Eva, Enzo and their three children welcome the doctor into their home and entrust their young daughter, Lilith to his care, not knowing that they are harboring one of the most dangerous criminals in the world. At the same time, Israeli agents are desperately looking to bring the German doctor to justice. Mengele was considered to be one of WWII’s most heinous Nazi war criminals. Please note that this movie is not recommended for children. Tickets can be purchased at the door or ordered online at www.circlecinema.com/tickets. Cost: $9/Adults; $7/Seniors, Students, Military; $6/Circle Cinema Members.