Archive for the ‘Past’ Category


Theodore Fried: Pivotal Moments in 20th Century Art

Monday, May 19th, 2014

June 8  – September 7, 2014 • Born at the beginning of an era in both art and politics, Theodore Fried was a talented young artist whose career intersected with the major movements in modern art during the 20th century. From Paris in the 1920s to New York after WWII, Fried was a member of the School of Paris and the Society of Modern Painters and Sculptors in New York. The survival of his talent and vision continued in New York. After his safe arrival in 1942, Fried established a studio and began to rebuild a body of American works. Exploring subject matter in the City-Central Park, neighborhood life, Fried began to show his modern paintings in contemporary exhibitions, garnering fresh recognition of his figurative works and color compositions. Following his death, he appointed a trust to perpetuate his work, and in 2004, the SMMJA received his estate. Now mounting the first extensive retrospective of his work, this original, self-curated show will demonstrate how Fried’s work and life bridged the Holocaust experience and encompassed early to mid-20th century fine art, drawing from the large collection of original art work and other archival material.

To download the exhibit catalogue for this original show, click here.


Tulsa Jewish Film Series: The German Doctor

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Tulsa Jewish Film Series —Our Films Aren’t Selected …They’re Chosen! Film: The German DoctorThurs., May 157 p.m.Circle Cinema (12 South Lewis Ave) • Patagonia, 1960. A German doctor meets an Argentinean family and follows them on a long desert road to a small town where the family will be starting a new life. Eva, Enzo and their three children welcome the doctor into their home and entrust their young daughter, Lilith to his care, not knowing that they are harboring one of the most dangerous criminals in the world. At the same time, Israeli agents are desperately looking to bring the German doctor to justice. Mengele was considered to be one of WWII’s most heinous Nazi war criminals. Please note that this movie is not recommended for children. Tickets can be purchased at the door or ordered online at Cost: $9/Adults; $7/Seniors, Students, Military; $6/Circle Cinema Members.

Eighth Annual Purim Mask Invitational

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Beginning on Sunday, March 16, hundreds of masks created by Tulsa area school children will once again fill the galleries at The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art as part of the Eighth Annual Purim Mask Invitational.

The masks are juried by a panel of local art experts in six separate age divisions with all masks competing for the “Best of Show” award. Prizes for the student artists range from gift cards to $50 cash for each divisional winner. The Best of Show Award it $150 and is the purchase price for the mask that becomes part of the Museum’s permanent collection. The Opening Reception & Purim Mask Awards Ceremony will be held on Thursday, March 27 from 5-7 p.m. in the Museum Lobby.

The Eighth Annual Purim Mask Invitational exhibit will be on display at the Museum until April 20, 2014. To view the exhibition catalogue, please click here.


Tulsa Jewish Film Series: The Prime Minsiters

Friday, November 1st, 2013

Join us for the third film in the partnership between Circle Cinema, Jewish Federation of Tulsa and The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. Based on the best-selling book by Ambassador Yehuda Avner, The Prime Ministers:The Pioneers takes the audience inside the offices of Israel’s Prime Ministers through the eyes of an insider. Avner served as a chief aide, English language note-taker and speechwriter to Levi Eshkol, Golda Meir, Yitzhak Rabin, Menachem Begin, and Shimon Peres. Tickets can be purchased at the door- Adults: $9, Seniors/Student/Military $7, Circle Member: $6.

Gen Society: Jewish Gangsters in Early 20th Century History

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

What do the movies The Godfather, American Gangsters, Goodfellas or TV shows The Soprano’s, Boardwalk Empire, and The Untouchables all have in common? There was always a Jewish gangster character involved!

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Tulsa which will be held on Sunday November 24th at 2:00 pm in the Dan Room will give you the real histories about Jewish gangsters that made up part of the Jewish experience in America. Phil Goldfarb, President of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Tulsa will lead a discussion and presentation on the backgrounds of many famous names that we are familiar with.

“Not many people know that underworld boss Meyer Lansky (born Meyer Suchowljansky) was the only Jew not allowed to stay in Israel, even with the ‘Law of Return’ and offering the Israel government $1 million dollars” according to Goldfarb. “We will talk about some of the more famous Jewish gangsters including Arnold ‘The Brain’ Rothstein who ‘fixed’ the 1919 World Series, Bugsy Segal, the man behind Las Vegas, or name changes for individuals such as Arthur Flegenheimer who became Dutch Schultz and Irving Wexler who became Waxey Gordon. Other famous Jewish gangsters include Jake “Greasy Thumb” Guzik (Al Capone’s money man) and for those with NY or NJ roots: Abner ‘Longy’ Zwillman, called the Al Capone of New Jersey.” This promises to be an interesting and fun program.

Time at the end of the meeting to help with any genealogy “brick walls” will also be available. New members are always welcome.

Tulsa Jewish Film Series: The ZigZag Kid

Friday, September 13th, 2013

Tulsa Jewish Film Series – Our Films Aren’t Selected…They’re Chosen! Film: The ZigZag KidWed., Oct. 307 p.m. • Circle Cinema (12 South Lewis Ave) • Join us for the 2nd film in the partnership between Circle Cinema, Jewish Federation of Tulsa and The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. A fast-paced, whimsical coming of age tale, “Nono, the Zigzag Kid” is a charming period picaresque that offers old-fashioned entertainment for tweens and adults. Tickets can be purchased at the door- Adults: $9, Seniors/Student/Military $7, Circle Member: $6

47th Anniversary Annual Gala

Friday, August 16th, 2013

Join us at The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art 47th Anniversary Annual Gala for an evening of fun, food, and art. The festivities this year will be held on Sunday, October 27, 2013 and will celebrate the past, present and future of the Museum. We are delighted to be honoring Fred Strauss for his dedication and leadership. Fred has given of his time as a board member and is one of our most popular docents. He has also donated an impressive collection of letters, postcards and stamps collected and curated since the 1940s that chronicle the history and traditions of the Jewish people.

The proceeds from the annual Gala help fund the Museum’s educational programming, exhibitions, and operations. Now, more than ever, your support is vital and ensures that the Museum will continue to serve as a powerful resource for better understanding and appreciation of diversity in our community. Formal invitations to this special event will follow later this summer.  Please click here to download a patron form.

If you have any questions, please contact Melissa Schnur, Museum Development Director at 918.492.1818.

The Sexuality Spectrum

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

The Sexuality Spectrum offers a groundbreaking exploration of sexual orientation through the creativity of over fifty international contemporary artists. Artists including Judy Chicago, Joan Snyder, Arthur Tress, Archie Rand, Albert Winn, Trix Rosen, Joan Roth, and Mark Podwal explore a broad range of subjects: the evolving social and religious attitudes toward sexuality; issues of alienation, marginalization, and inclusion; the impact on the family, child-rearing, and life stages; violence and persecution; AIDS/HIV; and the influence of the LGBTQI community on the Jewish and larger world.

Judy Chicago and Estelle Yarinsky reference Nazi persecution of gay victims during the Holocaust, as documented in Richard Grune’s rare wartime lithograph. Josh Lehrer captures haunting portraits of transgender youths in New York City. Helene Aylon, Susan Kaplow and Trix Rosen expose and refute the Biblical quotes in Leviticus that have engendered discrimination and intolerance, while Archie Rand looks to the Biblical David and Jonathan and prophet and warrior Deborah for other perspectives.

Curator Laura Kruger explained, “The HUC-JIR Museum staff held numerous focus groups with artists, asking them to share their intimate feelings concerning their lives as LGBTQI in the community, including their faith-based experiences. We frequently heard incidents of marginalization, isolation, and exclusion. They shared their long years of concealment as well as the wrenching experience of ‘coming out;’ their relationships with family members, employers, and friendships that disintegrated; and the search for life-long partners.”

Alexander Calder: Abstraction/Creation

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

Sept. 29-Feb. 2Mezzanine Gallery • Alexander Calder, a one-time engineering student who moved to Paris to become an artist, became an international sensation with his creation and development of abstract mobiles (hanging sculpture) Stabiles (floor mounted mobiles) and paintings. The twelve lithographs in this exhibit, La Mémoire Élémentaire, were created in the 1970s and are a perfect example of the sense of line and color that made Calder famous. The community is invited to join us for the opening reception for this show on Thurs., Oct. 3, 5-7 p.m.

Reproduction, including downloading of Alexander Calder works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.


Tulsa Jewish Film Series: Nicky’s Family

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013


Wed., Aug. 7 • 7 p.m. at Circle Cinema (12 South Lewis Ave) • Join us for Nicky’s Family, the inaugural film in this partnership between Circle Cinema, Jewish Federation of Tulsa and The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. Sir Nicholas Winton personally and by his own initiative saved the lives of 669 children from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia and brought them across Hitler’s Germany to Britain. For nearly 50 years, he kept secret how he rescued these children, not even his wife knew anything about it. The story only emerged in 1988 when the BBC broadcast a thrilling show about the first meeting of approximately one hundred of the rescued children with their secret rescuer about whom they had known nothing for 50 years. Today he is often called Britain’s Schindler. Alive and well at over 100, Sir Nicholas is still diffident about why he kept his secret for so long. He also is an immensely compelling symbol of how the caring of one man can truly make a difference.

Cost: $9/Adults, $7/Seniors, Military, Students, $6/Circle Cinema Members

To read The New York Times review of this “enthralling” movie, please click here.