Archive for the ‘Past’ Category

 

Ninth Annual Purim Mask Invitational

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

Purim Masks 2015 Slider copy

2015 Purim Masks Catalog

Ancient Ways: Modern Forms

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

February 5-April 2, 2015

Opening Reception: February 12

The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art is pleased to present the new exhibition Ancient Ways: Modern Forms, An Exploration of Related Experience in Native American and Jewish Cultures by Oklahoma Native Artists. This exhibit features the works of Cherokee treasures Jane Osti and Martha Berry, as well as works from the members of the Southeast Indian Artists Association, who created works that touch on traditions and related experiences in the cultures of two ancient tribal peoples: the Jewish people, and the Native American people.

Ancient Ways: Modern Forms was conceived as a means to find and celebrate the common ground shared by two cultures living here in Oklahoma: Jewish and Native American. The Sherwin Miller Museum asked the artists of the Southeastern Indian Artists Association to create a new work or find, in their existing work, a connection between the traditions and experiences of the two peoples; the tribes of Oklahoma and the tribes of Israel.

Most connections fell into two types; the importance of passing on traditions and keeping them alive, and the shared experiences of Diaspora and persecution.

One work is Troy Jackson’s remarkable sculpture Carrying Tradition, which is the embodiment of the cultural imperative of both peoples; to keep tradition alive and modernize it for use in our contemporary age. Artists Jane Osti, Chase Kahwinhut Earles, David Pruitt, Karin Walkingstick, and Scott Roberts created pottery based on ancient tribal forms; forms used by early potters in the ancient nations of Israel and Judah.

The second part of the exhibit is Eradicating the Other: Forced Removal, Diaspora, and Assimilation as Experienced by Native American and Jewish Peoples. Both cultures have suffered negative consequences for their beliefs and traditions. Artist Shan Goshorn created a woven basket, Pain. Parallel. Prayer, a Cherokee style singe-weave basket woven from paper splints printed with the definition of genocide and images of the Holocaust.

The Many Faces of Jerusalem

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

In 2012 to celebrate its 20th anniversary, the Israel Quilters Association put out a call to artists world-wide to attend the conference and to enter a quilt to be shown in an exhibit to be held during the conference.  The exhibit, titled The Many Faces of Jerusalem, was exhibited on the BYU campus on the Mount of Olives, and is coming to the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art in October 2014.

The Quilts chose Jerusalem for its international, multicultural character. The Capital of Israel, Jerusalem is holy to Jews, Christians and Muslims. People of many ethnic groups, nationalities and religions live together nestled among the history, architecture, and legends that span thousands of years.  The Israel Quilts Association invited artists to enter quilts in this exhibit; quilts that expressed their ideas, hopes, memories, and dreams of Jerusalem. The result is a multicolored and multicultural feast for the eyes; the textiles of dream.

 

Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

Both fans of Fine Art Photography and fans of Star Trek will be thrilled to see this acclaimed exhibit of Leonard Nimoy’s photography, Secret Selves. Due to his fame as Spock on Star Trek, Nimoy, an accomplished photographer who became an expert in dealing with another identity in his life, decided to investigate hidden identities—secret selves. He called for volunteers to participate in a session in which they revealed their secret selves, whether by costume, pose, or attitude. The resulting portraits are the Secret Selves exhibit.

 

 

Miller Kids: Find in Fried

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

Miller Kids Family Art Workshop: Find in Fried • Sun., June 22 • 1 p.m. • Join us for an hour of family fun exploring the Theodore Fried exhibit in this interactive workshop. A scavenger hunt through the exhibit will challenge children as they search for objects to Find in Fried while exploring Pivotal Moments in 20th Century Art.

Theodore Fried: Pivotal Moments in 20th Century Art

Monday, May 19th, 2014

June 8  – September 7, 2014 • Born at the beginning of an era in both art and politics, Theodore Fried was a talented young artist whose career intersected with the major movements in modern art during the 20th century. From Paris in the 1920s to New York after WWII, Fried was a member of the School of Paris and the Society of Modern Painters and Sculptors in New York. The survival of his talent and vision continued in New York. After his safe arrival in 1942, Fried established a studio and began to rebuild a body of American works. Exploring subject matter in the City-Central Park, neighborhood life, Fried began to show his modern paintings in contemporary exhibitions, garnering fresh recognition of his figurative works and color compositions. Following his death, he appointed a trust to perpetuate his work, and in 2004, the SMMJA received his estate. Now mounting the first extensive retrospective of his work, this original, self-curated show will demonstrate how Fried’s work and life bridged the Holocaust experience and encompassed early to mid-20th century fine art, drawing from the large collection of original art work and other archival material.

To download the exhibit catalogue for this original show, click here.

 

Eighth Annual Purim Mask Invitational

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Beginning on Sunday, March 16, hundreds of masks created by Tulsa area school children will once again fill the galleries at The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art as part of the Eighth Annual Purim Mask Invitational.

The masks are juried by a panel of local art experts in six separate age divisions with all masks competing for the “Best of Show” award. Prizes for the student artists range from gift cards to $50 cash for each divisional winner. The Best of Show Award it $150 and is the purchase price for the mask that becomes part of the Museum’s permanent collection. The Opening Reception & Purim Mask Awards Ceremony will be held on Thursday, March 27 from 5-7 p.m. in the Museum Lobby.

The Eighth Annual Purim Mask Invitational exhibit will be on display at the Museum until April 20, 2014. To view the exhibition catalogue, please click here.

 

The Sexuality Spectrum

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

The Sexuality Spectrum offers a groundbreaking exploration of sexual orientation through the creativity of over fifty international contemporary artists. Artists including Judy Chicago, Joan Snyder, Arthur Tress, Archie Rand, Albert Winn, Trix Rosen, Joan Roth, and Mark Podwal explore a broad range of subjects: the evolving social and religious attitudes toward sexuality; issues of alienation, marginalization, and inclusion; the impact on the family, child-rearing, and life stages; violence and persecution; AIDS/HIV; and the influence of the LGBTQI community on the Jewish and larger world.

Judy Chicago and Estelle Yarinsky reference Nazi persecution of gay victims during the Holocaust, as documented in Richard Grune’s rare wartime lithograph. Josh Lehrer captures haunting portraits of transgender youths in New York City. Helene Aylon, Susan Kaplow and Trix Rosen expose and refute the Biblical quotes in Leviticus that have engendered discrimination and intolerance, while Archie Rand looks to the Biblical David and Jonathan and prophet and warrior Deborah for other perspectives.

Curator Laura Kruger explained, “The HUC-JIR Museum staff held numerous focus groups with artists, asking them to share their intimate feelings concerning their lives as LGBTQI in the community, including their faith-based experiences. We frequently heard incidents of marginalization, isolation, and exclusion. They shared their long years of concealment as well as the wrenching experience of ‘coming out;’ their relationships with family members, employers, and friendships that disintegrated; and the search for life-long partners.”

Alexander Calder: Abstraction/Creation

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

Sept. 29-Feb. 2Mezzanine Gallery • Alexander Calder, a one-time engineering student who moved to Paris to become an artist, became an international sensation with his creation and development of abstract mobiles (hanging sculpture) Stabiles (floor mounted mobiles) and paintings. The twelve lithographs in this exhibit, La Mémoire Élémentaire, were created in the 1970s and are a perfect example of the sense of line and color that made Calder famous. The community is invited to join us for the opening reception for this show on Thurs., Oct. 3, 5-7 p.m.

Reproduction, including downloading of Alexander Calder works is prohibited by copyright laws and international conventions without the express written permission of Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

 

Alexander Kanchik: Jewish Life and Folk Tales

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

Born in Moldova, Kanchik’s paintings and sculpture envision village life in Russia, as well as illustrate the short stories written by Isaac Bashevis Singer. Kanchik’s work is colorful and humorous; populated by merchants and rabbis, fairies and fools, and even vampires and mummies. 

The pieces in the exhibition are available for purchase.