Archive for the ‘Past’ Category

 

50th Anniversary Party

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

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Tenth Annual Purim Mask Invitational

Tuesday, January 19th, 2016

Beginning on Sunday, March 10, hundreds of masks created by Tulsa area school children will once again fill the galleries at The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art as part of the Tenth Annual Purim Mask Invitational.

The masks are juried by a panel of local art experts in three separate age divisions with all masks competing for the “Best of Show” award. Cash prizes will be handed out for each divisional winner. The Best of Show Award it $150 and is the purchase price for the mask that becomes part of the Museum’s permanent collection. In addition, the Museum will be giving out the People’s Choice Award via Facebook. Keep an eye on the Museum’s Facebook page for the online gallery. The Closing Reception & Purim Mask Awards Ceremony will be held on Thursday, April 14 from 5-7 p.m. in the Museum Lobby.

The Tenth Annual Purim Mask Invitational exhibit will be on display at the Museum until  from March 10-April 17, 2016. To view the requirements to enter your schools masks in this exhibit, please click here: 2016 Purim Call for Entries

State of Deception: Teacher Workshop

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015

SOD Teacher Workshop

SOD Teacher Workshop

Night of Muses

Thursday, August 27th, 2015

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Night of Muses-Sunday, October 18, benefiting The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. For your enjoyment, the evening will offer a silent auction featuring first-run, limited-edition lithographs from the Theodore Fried Collection, performances by members of the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame, Tulsa Opera and youth poets from Louder Than a Bomb. Following the dinner program, an after party with live music from the Jam ‘Bassadors will cap the evening. Please contact the museum to RSVP. Patron opportunities available.

2015 STUDENT PROPAGANDA ART EXHIBIT SHERWIN MILLER MUSEUM OF JEWISH ART

Friday, August 7th, 2015

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2015 STUDENT PROPAGANDA ART EXHIBIT SHERWIN MILLER MUSEUM OF JEWISH ART

Who: All middle and high school students are eligible to enter the contest.

What: The exhibit will feature artwork created in response to the following prompt:

Not all propaganda is negative. Propaganda is biased information intentionally spread to shape public opinion and behavior. The Nazis’ use of propaganda was created with the intent to spread their message of race hatred. For the purpose of this exhibition, we challenge you to create a piece of propaganda that serves to spread positive ideas and information for the benefit of humanity.

Where: Artwork will be exhibited in the Sharna Newman Frank Education Gallery at the Sherwin Miller Museum in the fall of 2015.

When: Artwork will be accepted from August 10, 2015-October 23, 2015

Criteria:
• “Artwork” is understood to be visual art in any medium, but is not understood to refer to film, music, dance or drama (the performing arts).
• All artworks should be easily portable and either freestanding, or be able to sit on an easel or a tabletop.
• Artworks may be submitted by individual students or by groups of students.
• The artist/s name, school and teacher should appear on the artwork in a place that is not visible when displayed (such as the bottom or back of the artwork).
• A short (1-3 sentence) artist/s’ statement should accompany each artwork.
• Artworks that require batteries or electricity may not be displayed, for logistical reasons.

This student art exhibit will be in conjunction with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Exhibit, which will be at the Sherwin Miller Museum from September 30, 2015 – February 16, 2016:

State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda

Monday, July 27th, 2015

September 30, 2015- February 21, 2016

“Propaganda is a truly terrible weapon in the hands of an expert.”
Adolf Hitler, Mein Kampf, 1924

The Nazi Party developed a sophisticated propaganda machine that deftly spread lies about its political opponents, Jews, and the need to justify war. Nazi propaganda was much more complex than that. For the Nazis to achieve power and pursue their racial policies and expansionist war efforts, a much more nuanced picture had to be painted-one that would appeal to broad swaths of the population, not just a fanatical extreme.

State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda draws visitors into a rich multimedia environment vividly illustrating the insidious allure of much of Nazi propaganda. “Adolf Hitler was an avid student of propaganda and borrowed techniques from the Allies in World War I, his Socialist and Communist rivals, the Italian Fascist Party, as well as modern advertising,” says exhibition curator Steven Luckert. “Drawing upon these models, he successfully marketed the Nazi Party, its ideology, and himself to the German people.”

The exhibition reveals how shortly after World War I, the Nazi Party began to transform itself from an obscure, extremist group into the largest political party in democratic Germany. Hitler early on recognized how propaganda, combined with the use of terror, could help his radical party gain mass support and votes. He personally adapted the ancient symbol of the swastika and the emotive colors of red, black, and white to create the movement’s flag. In doing so, Hitler established a potent visual identity that has branded the Nazi Party ever since.

After seizing power, the Nazi Party took over all communications in Germany. It marshaled the state’s resources to consolidate power and relentlessly promote its vision of a “racially pure,” utopian Germany that needed to defend itself from those who would destroy it. Jews were cast as the primary enemies, but others, including Roma, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and mentally and physically disabled persons, were also portrayed as threats to the “national community.”

As Germany pushed the world into war, Nazi propaganda rationalized Germany’s territorial expansion as self-defense. Jews were depicted as agents of disease and corruption. The Nazis’ actions against them, in Germany and occupied countries, were promoted as necessary measures to protect the population at large.

 

Teacher Workshop

Theodore Fried: Beyond the Still Life

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

Theodore Fried: Beyond the Still Life

Fried was born just after the turn of the 20th century, to an upper-class Hungarian family. Along with the Victorian social conventions he would have learned in childhood was a custom that has fallen out of practice today: the practice of sending specific messages with flowers.

Currently making a comeback in the 21st century, the language of flowers was a Victorian custom by which, in a society that refrained from direct speech and obsessed with detail and subtlety, a message or sentiment that was not so easily expressed in words could be conveyed in a floral arrangement. In other words, sending a flower arrangement was the same as sending a text message to someone today.

What messages could Fried’s still life paintings convey?

Visit the exhibition, on view May-August 30, 2015, at the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art.

Louis Davidson: Synagogues 360

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Louis Davidson: Synagogues 360

Gallery: Brodsky Fine Arts Gallery and Second Floor Special Exhibition Gallery

April 26, 2015 – August 30, 2015

SYNAGOGUES360 provides a visual record of Jewish culture, showing and preserving synagogues by means of interactive 360 degree panoramic photos. It invites you and future generations to view the interiors of Jewish places of worship, which are clear and irrefutable indicators of the state of Jewish culture, architecture, art and stature in their communities throughout the Diaspora. Each synagogue is literally a “sign of the times” and window into the Jewish past and present.

Time, weather, political and demographic shift inevitably erode cities and buildings. These along with occasional upsurges of violent anti-Semitism, have been particularly thorough erasers of the physical evidence of Jewish history. SYNAGOGUES360 visually and digitally saves Jewish synagogues, an impressive physical expression of Jewish culture, for this and future generations to see and experience. (www.synagogues360.org)

Ninth Annual Purim Mask Invitational

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

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2015 Purim Masks Catalog

Ancient Ways: Modern Forms

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

February 5-April 2, 2015

Opening Reception: February 12

The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art is pleased to present the new exhibition Ancient Ways: Modern Forms, An Exploration of Related Experience in Native American and Jewish Cultures by Oklahoma Native Artists. This exhibit features the works of Cherokee treasures Jane Osti and Martha Berry, as well as works from the members of the Southeast Indian Artists Association, who created works that touch on traditions and related experiences in the cultures of two ancient tribal peoples: the Jewish people, and the Native American people.

Ancient Ways: Modern Forms was conceived as a means to find and celebrate the common ground shared by two cultures living here in Oklahoma: Jewish and Native American. The Sherwin Miller Museum asked the artists of the Southeastern Indian Artists Association to create a new work or find, in their existing work, a connection between the traditions and experiences of the two peoples; the tribes of Oklahoma and the tribes of Israel.

Most connections fell into two types; the importance of passing on traditions and keeping them alive, and the shared experiences of Diaspora and persecution.

One work is Troy Jackson’s remarkable sculpture Carrying Tradition, which is the embodiment of the cultural imperative of both peoples; to keep tradition alive and modernize it for use in our contemporary age. Artists Jane Osti, Chase Kahwinhut Earles, David Pruitt, Karin Walkingstick, and Scott Roberts created pottery based on ancient tribal forms; forms used by early potters in the ancient nations of Israel and Judah.

The second part of the exhibit is Eradicating the Other: Forced Removal, Diaspora, and Assimilation as Experienced by Native American and Jewish Peoples. Both cultures have suffered negative consequences for their beliefs and traditions. Artist Shan Goshorn created a woven basket, Pain. Parallel. Prayer, a Cherokee style singe-weave basket woven from paper splints printed with the definition of genocide and images of the Holocaust.