Archive for the ‘Featured’ Category

 

State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda

Monday, July 27th, 2015

September 30, 2015- February 21, 2016

“Propaganda is a truly terrible weapon in the hands of an expert.”
Adolf Hitler, Mein Kampf, 1924

The Nazi Party developed a sophisticated propaganda machine that deftly spread lies about its political opponents, Jews, and the need to justify war. Nazi propaganda was much more complex than that. For the Nazis to achieve power and pursue their racial policies and expansionist war efforts, a much more nuanced picture had to be painted-one that would appeal to broad swaths of the population, not just a fanatical extreme.

Featuring rarely seen artifacts, State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda draws visitors into a rich multimedia environment vividly illustrating the insidious allure of much of Nazi propaganda. “Adolf Hitler was an avid student of propaganda and borrowed techniques from the Allies in World War I, his Socialist and Communist rivals, the Italian Fascist Party, as well as modern advertising,” says exhibition curator Steven Luckert. “Drawing upon these models, he successfully marketed the Nazi Party, its ideology, and himself to the German people.”

The exhibition reveals how shortly after World War I, the Nazi Party began to transform itself from an obscure, extremist group into the largest political party in democratic Germany. Hitler early on recognized how propaganda, combined with the use of terror, could help his radical party gain mass support and votes. He personally adapted the ancient symbol of the swastika and the emotive colors of red, black, and white to create the movement’s flag. In doing so, Hitler established a potent visual identity that has branded the Nazi Party ever since.

After seizing power, the Nazi Party took over all communications in Germany. It marshaled the state’s resources to consolidate power and relentlessly promote its vision of a “racially pure,” utopian Germany that needed to defend itself from those who would destroy it. Jews were cast as the primary enemies, but others, including Roma, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and mentally and physically disabled persons, were also portrayed as threats to the “national community.”

As Germany pushed the world into war, Nazi propaganda rationalized Germany’s territorial expansion as self-defense. Jews were depicted as agents of disease and corruption. The Nazis’ actions against them, in Germany and occupied countries, were promoted as necessary measures to protect the population at large.

Theodore Fried: Beyond the Still Life

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

Theodore Fried: Beyond the Still Life

Fried was born just after the turn of the 20th century, to an upper-class Hungarian family. Along with the Victorian social conventions he would have learned in childhood was a custom that has fallen out of practice today: the practice of sending specific messages with flowers.

Currently making a comeback in the 21st century, the language of flowers was a Victorian custom by which, in a society that refrained from direct speech and obsessed with detail and subtlety, a message or sentiment that was not so easily expressed in words could be conveyed in a floral arrangement. In other words, sending a flower arrangement was the same as sending a text message to someone today.

What messages could Fried’s still life paintings convey?

Visit the exhibition, on view May-August 30, 2015, at the Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art.

Louis Davidson: Synagogues 360

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Louis Davidson: Synagogues 360

Gallery: Brodsky Fine Arts Gallery and Second Floor Special Exhibition Gallery

April 26, 2015 – August 30, 2015

SYNAGOGUES360 provides a visual record of Jewish culture, showing and preserving synagogues by means of interactive 360 degree panoramic photos. It invites you and future generations to view the interiors of Jewish places of worship, which are clear and irrefutable indicators of the state of Jewish culture, architecture, art and stature in their communities throughout the Diaspora. Each synagogue is literally a “sign of the times” and window into the Jewish past and present.

Time, weather, political and demographic shift inevitably erode cities and buildings. These along with occasional upsurges of violent anti-Semitism, have been particularly thorough erasers of the physical evidence of Jewish history. SYNAGOGUES360 visually and digitally saves Jewish synagogues, an impressive physical expression of Jewish culture, for this and future generations to see and experience. (www.synagogues360.org)

Art & Technology Unite for Museum’s New App

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art is pleased to announce the launch of a unique new digital installation and take home app for iPad developed by Tulsa-based semantic technology company Moomat.

“This cutting edge technology allows people across the world to explore our Museum’s collections,” said Drew Diamond, Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art Executive Director. “The Sherwin Miller is dedicated to promoting Jewish heritage, history and culture through art and education. Thanks to Moomat and this new installation and app, we are able to share that mission locally and globally.”

“We’re excited to be working with such a forward thinking museum and are continuing to help them to develop new and interesting ways to increase the explorability and interactivity of their many other collections in the future,“ said Moomat CEO Daniel Mooney.

The first technology project between Moomat and the Museum was to create an interactive way for guests to explore the vast Fred Strauss Collection, an impressive collection of letters, postcards and stamps collected and curated since the 1940s that chronicle the history and traditions of the Jewish people.

The new iPad app is a take home version of this collection that allows anyone to download and explore the collection in great detail, and how it connects with various aspects of Jewish culture and history.  Plans are in motion to develop and release new digital installations revolving around the Museum’s extensive collections and to actively incorporate them in the commercial app.

To download Sherwin Miller Application on iPad:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sherwin-miller/id699889107?mt=8

About Moomat:  Moomat LLC is an Oklahoma based company that produces tools to enable businesses, media, cultural institutions and others to curate archives and other digital libraries. They are currently developing the largest database of semantically connected data in the world with over 50 million connected entities to date, and are rapidly implementing their Deep Diver and CultureScout platforms for a variety of businesses. Moomat was founded in 2012. Learn more at: www.moomat.com / www.facebook.com/moomat / www.twitter.com/moomat

 

Miller Kids Workshop: Jewish Life & Folktales

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

Join us for an hour of exploring the Alexander Kanchik exhibit in this interactive workshop for children on Sunday, August 4 from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. A quest through the exhibit will put the children’s minds to work as they explore the world of Kanchik’s art.  This free workshop is open to children of all ages and includes free museum admission for the day. For more information, contact Tracey at 918-492-1818.

Kinder-Stone Project

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art recently launched the Kinder-Stone Project™ to commemorate children who perished during the Holocaust. Approximately six million Jews were killed by the end of World War II by the Nazis and over one million were estimated to be under the age of 18 at the time of their deaths.  Children were often among the first victims sent to their deaths since they were considered non-productive and also symbolized the continued Jewish existence.

Utilizing the central database of survivor’s names at Yad Vashem (the world center for Holocaust research, education, documentation and commemoration) in Jerusalem, the Museum is providing to each touring student a stone bearing the name and age of a child who died. Student visitors then decorate the stones which will become a permanent part of the Community Garden at our partner agency the Jewish Federation.  The SMMJA has begun the Kinder-Stone Project™ on a limited, trial basis this spring and student response has been positive.  One eleventh-grade student from East Central High School said, “I want to make sure that I really get this right. I want to respect her memory and don’t ever want this to happen to another kid again.”

The Museum works closely with educators in public and private middle and high schools, as well as professors at area universities, to organize group tours that relate to art, Holocaust, and history curriculum. As part of the Any Given Child program that begins in Fall 2013, the Museum will host every seventh grade student from Tulsa Public Schools. These approximately 3,000 students will not only have completed a curriculum developed collaboratively by the Museum and the Council for Holocaust Education but will also participate in a docent-led tour of the Holocaust exhibit. Following a recent tour led by a survivor, a student evaluation said, “Thank you for telling us your stories so that we and future generations can know them. To know history is very important to me as through it, we can know our past and the mistakes of others. We…can know…so that we can prevent these horrible things from happening.”

The Kinder-Stone Project™ will be incorporated into every Any Given Child tour, as well as every tour for area schools and civic groups, resulting in approximately 5,000 completed memorial stones within the first 18 months.